Friday, July 19, 2013

Plan B of the Roller Skate Maxi dress # July "Flip this pattern" (and handwoven plaid fabric giveaway!)

This is no.2 of the Roller Skate Pattern Flip for July's "Flip this pattern", the wonderful series hosted by FrancesSuzanne... I just can't stop. It's addicted!

Modified Roller Skate Maxi dress (Plan B)
I call this maxi dress "Plan B" because it didn't turn out as I intended. My first design didn't change the silhouette of the original version this much. I planed to make it a maxi with changing from A line skirt to half circle skirt with ruffle hem and adding front placket to the top part of the dress.



To created draped maxi skirt, I need to separate top part and skirt part and cut the skirt on bias. Along the way, I may lost my conscious somehow and attached only the body lining with the skirt part while the bodice was unattached!!!


Too lazy to get it right with seam ripper To challenged the mistake, I decided to go to plan B with the bodice unattached. Then my plan B included:
-Lengthen the bodice part with eyelet lace
-The elastic band was attached only to the bodice lining
-Adding the crochet collar instead of placket
-Pop the dress up with yellow accent



Then I got the Maxi dress which seem like the bodice separate from the dress. It's far away from my first version of Roller Skate pattern Flip. I was impressed that one pattern can make total different looks! And you will even more amazed to see how others mom flip this pattern to their own way here.



Do you like the fabrics of this dress? I made the dress from Thai traditional handwoven plaid called "Pa-kao-ma. 
Handwoven plaid cloths, Pha-kao-ma (source: 1234)
Pha-kao-ma is a basic stable piece in Thai's household. It is a multipurpose garment. Used as a towel, sarong, sash, carrying, wrapping and etc. in Thai culture from at least 900 years. 

Traditional ways to use Pha kao ma in Thai culture (Source : 12)
I love the variety of Pha-kao-ma's color. I bought them every time that I've got a chance when travel to upcountry. Normally it will come in rectangle shape, with the coordinated strips at both end of the piece. Nowadays we may find both manufacturer and handwoven Pha-kao-ma but I prefer the latter. Anyway the handwoven piece is FRAY TERRIBLY!


Now to celebrated the first month of my first blog. I would like to send this Thai traditional fabric as a giveaway for anyone who might interested. If you'd like to have an experience with this handwoven Pha-kao-ma, please leave the comment to tell me how to manage such a super fray fabric without a serger. I will randomly select one suggestion at end of July and send her Pha-kao-ma to try on. (Call me Pha-kao-ma ambassador! :)

Thank you for stop by.


18 comments:

  1. I love that plaid....and how you turned it to create a different 'look' for the skirt portion of your outfit!! NICE!!

    ReplyDelete
  2. What a great look! I especially like the bodice! As for the fabric...my husband got me some fabric in Africa one time that was hand woven. Same problem and I don't have a serger either. What I did was cut off the fringes and immediately ran it through my machine with a wide zigzag, one side at a time. While it wasn't as great as a serger it did stop a lot of the fraying. Hope that helps. As I was thinking I wonder if you cut just slightly ahead on the fabric as you ran it through a rolled hem foot. Might be a little more time consuming though.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you :)
      I did try on rolled hem foot but seems like the fabric is too thick to feed through the foot beautifully.

      Delete
  3. Wow!
    Your flip is (once again) amazing!
    And those fabrics are gorgeous! I always finish my garments raw edges with zigzag since I don't have a serger. Do you think that would be enough?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you :)
      I did zigzag seams for this dress but still think there are some area need to be improve. The fabric itself is very easy to fray.

      Delete
  4. great fabric! The easy answer is to do a wide zig zag at a medium stitch length over your edge... but it still might fray. The best solution would be french seams: you sew wrong sides together, trim the seam allowance, flip and sew right sides togeher (making sure your remaining seam allowance is caught between the two seams. This will prevent any fraying and will give strong seams that are beautifully finished.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you :)
      I would try french seams on the next chance.

      Delete
  5. The bodice being separate from the skirt is a pretty cool twist!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was accidentally happen. Buy I love it as it be. :)

      Delete
  6. This is adorable! I love what you did with the pattern.

    ReplyDelete
  7. What a sweet look! I love how everyone has made this pattern their own, and you showcase that so well here. Lovely!
    Ledys
    www.fromthesunnyside.wordpress.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's amazing, is'n it.
      Start with only one pattern and a lot of variation came up! Superb.

      Delete
  8. Is a beautiful dress. Love the separate parts. And without serger I sewed the edges with zigzag.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I love your flip! I got mine in last minute and didn't get a chance to look through all the others. Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  10. I know this is well past the giveaway, but...

    For side seams I would use French seams. For hems, cuffs, necklines, etc., I would embrace the fray! It's one of the qualities of the fabric that shows it is handmade, so I'd let it show. Use a satin stitch about an inch or so in from the edge to secure it then remove threads to make a fringe. On the zigzag part, I might try a tear-away stabizer to help secure it a bit more.

    ReplyDelete